Pemigewasset Wilderness, New Hampshire

Pemigewasset Wilderness - Franconia Brook during the summer months. The southern end of Owls Head can been see in the distance. Located in Franconia, New Hampshire.
Franconia Brook – Pemi Wilderness, New Hampshire
 

Pemigewasset Wilderness, New Hampshire – The Pemigewasset (Pemi) Wilderness in New Hampshire is 45,000-acres of protected designated wilderness area that will keep any outdoor photographer busy for days. Every corner of the wilderness has interesting features to explore, and most areas are rich with East Branch & Lincoln Railroad history. Here are five shots from the Pemigewasset Wilderness that you may have never seen.

Pemigewasset Wilderness -  Wetlands area along an old sled road off the old East Branch & Lincoln Logging Railroad in the Shoal Pond Valley of Lincoln, New Hampshire USA. The East Branch & Lincoln Railroad was a logging railroad that operated from 1893 - 1948.
Shoal Pond Valley – Pemi Wilderness, New Hampshire
 

The Shoal Pond valley of the Pemigewasset Wilderness is an incredible area. Believe it or not, a sled road off the old East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948) traveled through the wetlands in the above image. Wetland areas were corduroyed with small logs laid crossways. These logs formed a bridge of sorts that allowed horse teams, pulling logs, to cross the wetlands safely during the winter months. View this corduroyed section here.

Pemigewasset Wilderness - Remnants of the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad bed in the area of Stillwater Junction in Lincoln, New Hampshire USA. This section of railroad led to Camp 19.  This was an logging railroad, which was in operation from 1893 - 1948.
Stillwater Junction – Pemi Wilderness, New Hampshire
 

Evidence of the old East Branch & Lincoln Railroad grade can still be found in many parts of the Pemigewasset Wilderness. The railroad grade above, which leads to Camp 19, at Stillwater Junction is amazing! Cedar Brook, Franconia Brook, Lincoln Woods, and the Wilderness Trails are just a few trails that actually follow the old railroad grade. My blog article on the Trails of the Pemi should get you thinking.

Cascade along Redrock Brook in the Pemigewasset Wilderness of Franconia, New Hampshire during the autumn months. This area was logged during the East Branch & Lincoln Logging Railroad (1893-1948) era.
Redrock Brook – Pemi Wilderness, New Hampshire
 

It's hard to imagine the Pemigewasset Wilderness being a wasteland during the late 19th-century and 20th century, and man was responsible for the destruction. It has taken over fifty years for the Pemigewasset Wilderness to recover from the logging era. And yes the mark of the logger is still present and will be for many more years, but someday all signs of the logging era will be gone.

Remnants of an spur line along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad in the Thoreau Falls Valley of the Pemigewasset Wilderness in Lincoln, New Hampshire USA. This was a logging railroad, which operated from 1893 - 1948.
Thoreau Falls Valley – Pemi Wilderness, New Hampshire
 

Even though the mark of the 20th-century logger is still visible in many areas of this wilderness, at 45,000-acres the remoteness, and seclusion is what draws backcountry campers and hikers to the Pemigewasset Wilderness year after year. A week camping in this unique wilderness area will change your outlook on life. At least it did for me.

As a conservation minded society, we have to take the needed steps to ensure man never destroys this one of a kind designated wilderness again. View more images of the White Mountains New Hampshire here.

Happy image making..


 

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Erin Paul is a professional photographer who specializes in environmental conservation and historic preservation photography in the New Hampshire White Mountains. His work is published worldwide, and credits include; Backpacker Magazine, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, the Appalachian Mountain Club, and The Wilderness Society.

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