Legitimate Flagging, White Mountains

Flagging and yellow blazing on birch tree along the Mount Tecumseh Trail in the White Mountains, New Hampshire. The Mt Tecumseh Trail is a perfect example – For a short time, a number of trees along the trail had unmarked survey flagging tape on them. These flagged trees were part of research being done by one of the local colleges. Once the field research was completed the flagging was removed. Mt Tecumseh Trail seems be the focal point of research because flagging is always on big and small trees along the trail.
Flagging on Birch Tree – Mt Tecumseh Trail (2012)
 

Legitimate Flagging (survey tape) – On a trail inspection with a Forest Service assistant district ranger in 2012, a topic of discussion was survey flagging tape on trees along the White Mountains trail system. It needs to be pointed out that some of the survey flagging tape you see along trails in the White Mountains marks trees that are being used for research. Much of this flagging has no identifying marks on it, and there is no way to determine its purpose. Once the research is finished, proper parties hike up the trail and remove the flagging.

The Mt Tecumseh Trail (above) is a perfect example. For a short time, a number of trees along the trail had unmarked survey flagging tape on them. These flagged trees were part of research being done by one of the local colleges. Once the field research was completed, the flagging was removed.

This is just one example of legitimate flagging, and there are other reasons why an area may be flagged. Many hikers hate seeing flagging all over the trail system, but some of its being used in a positive manner. The point is not all the flagging you see out there is bad. We also discussed improper trail blazing.

Happy image making..


 

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Erin Paul is a professional photographer, writer, and author who specializes in environmental conservation and historic preservation photography in the New Hampshire White Mountains. His work is published worldwide, and credits include; Backpacker Magazine, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, the Appalachian Mountain Club, and The Wilderness Society.

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