Lyndonville Air Force Station, East Haven

The abandoned dinning hall at Lyndonville Air Force Station on East Mountain in East Haven, Vermont. The US Air Force built the North Concord Radar Station on top of East Mountain in 1955. Its name was changed to Lyndonville Air force Station in 1962 and then closed in 1963. In 1961, the station supposedly reported a UFO sighting just a few hours (+/-) before the reported abduction of Barney and Betty Hill on September 19-20, 1961.
Lyndonville Air Force Station – Dinning Hall
 

Lyndonville Air Force Station, Vermont – Here is a quick run down on an interesting abandoned Air Force radar station in New England. Yes, you read correctly, an abandoned radar station in Vermont's Northeast Kingdom.

In 1955 the US Air Force built the North Concord Radar Station on East Mountain (3,439 ft) in East Haven, Vermont. The name was changed to Lyndonville Air Force Station in 1962 and closed in 1963.

Lyndonville Air Force Station on East Mountain in East Haven, Vermont. The US Air Force built the North Concord Radar Station on top of East Mountain in 1955. Its name was changed to Lyndonville Air force Station in 1962 and then closed in 1963. In 1961, the station supposedly reported a UFO sighting, just a few hours (+/-) before the reported abduction of Barney and Betty Hill on September 19-20, 1961. This is a HDR of the interior of the Dining Hall.
Lyndonville Air Force Station – Dinning Hall
 

The radar station is made up of two areas. The radar buildings are located on the mountain summit, and about a mile below the summit is the cantonment where military and civilian personnel lived. The remaining buildings still on the premises are deteriorating and have seen better days. Most have been gutted and vandalized.

Lyndonville Air Force Station on East Mountain in East Haven, Vermont. The US Air Force built the North Concord Radar Station on top of East Mountain in 1955. Its name was changed to Lyndonville Air force Station in 1962 and then closed in 1963. In 1961, the station supposedly reported a UFO sighting, just a few hours (+/-) before the reported abduction of Barney and Betty Hill on September 19-20, 1961.
Lyndonville Air Force Station – Access Road
 

The access road that travels to the summit I find amazing. It is still in great condition, even after all these years! Even though its a one lane road (imagine Fraconia Bike Path very grown in), when the gate is open, vehicles can drive to the summit without any problems. The problem comes when two vehicles headed in opposite directions meet along the access road. Someone will be backing up for a long ways.

Lyndonville Air Force Station on East Mountain in East Haven, Vermont. The US Air Force built the North Concord Radar Station on top of East Mountain in 1955. Its name was changed to Lyndonville Air force Station in 1962 and then closed in 1963. In 1961, the station supposedly reported a UFO sighting, just a few hours (+/-) before the reported abduction of Barney and Betty Hill on September 19-20, 1961.
Lyndonville Air Force Station – Asbestos Sign
 

Asbestos signs warning of the potential medical dangers are visible on many of the buildings. Broken glass, building debris and sharp metal objects require visitors to be careful when exploring the base.

Lyndonville Air Force Station on East Mountain in East Haven, Vermont. The US Air Force built the North Concord Radar Station on top of East Mountain in 1955. Its name was changed to Lyndonville Air force Station in 1962 and then closed in 1963. In 1961, the station supposedly reported a UFO sighting, just a few hours (+/-) before the reported abduction of Barney and Betty Hill on September 19-20, 1961.
Lyndonville Air Force Station – Summit
 

This radar station supposedly reported an unidentified flying object (UFO) sighting just a few hours before the reported abduction of Barney and Betty Hill in New Hampshire on September 19-20, 1961. The Hill incident was the first widely reported UFO abduction report in the Untied States. Only in New England! 

Lyndonville Air Force Station on East Mountain in East Haven, Vermont. The US Air Force built the North Concord Radar Station on top of East Mountain in 1955. Its name was changed to Lyndonville Air force Station in 1962 and then closed in 1963. In 1961, the station supposedly reported a UFO sighting, just a few hours (+/-) before the reported abduction of Barney and Betty Hill on September 19-20, 1961.
Lyndonville Air Force Station – Summit Tower
 

It was once privately owned, but that didn't work out and over the years many ideas have been suggested on what to do with the base. One idea included turning the base into a museum of sorts. East Mountain also has been the focus of wind turbines in the past. For now, the site remains abandoned and reminds visitors of the cold war era. At some point, the base will become just a memory.

If you do your research you will be surprised at some of the ongoings around this base. All of the above images can be licensed for publications by clicking on the image you are interested in, and you can see more images of the abandoned Lyndonville Air Force Station here.

Happy image making..


 

2018 winter – From what I understand this land has been bought by a logging company, and the buildings are owned by another person. And at this point, I am unsure if the area can still be visited. If you decide to explore this abandoned site – do some research first to make sure you won’t get in any trouble.

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Erin Paul is a professional photographer who specializes in environmental conservation and historic preservation photography in the New Hampshire White Mountains. His work is published worldwide, and credits include; Backpacker Magazine, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, the Appalachian Mountain Club, and The Wilderness Society.

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18 Responses to “Lyndonville Air Force Station, East Haven”

    • Erin Paul Donovan

      Hi Rachel,

      Last time I was there, in 2013, the access road (it has a gate) to the Base was open. But I heard the area has since been bought by a logging company. So I am unsure if we can still explore the area. Sorry that I am not much help. If I hear anything, I will let you know.

      Reply
      • Taylor

        Hi,

        Do you know how many buildings you are able to explore if it is still allowed?

        Reply
        • Erin Paul Donovan

          Hi Taylor,

          The last time I was there (2013) a number of buildings were open, and could be walked into. But going into the buildings has been discouraged for as long I can remember. And from what I understand the site has changed ownership so I am unsure if we can still explore the area. I am not much help to you…

          Reply
          • Taylor

            Hi Erin,

             Sorry it took long for a response haven't been on here for sometime, thank you for the building info and I just got info who went recently(last fall) and they said it's open still.

            Reply
  1. francois mackay

    Wow, Ric Brighton and Howard Otty, I would love to see some old photos that you two might have, I just recently went there and just say that I'm very intrigued by it, I have not been up topside yet, That's next, I hope!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  2. Ric Britton

    I would love to hear from anyone whom I might have known back then.

    Reply
    • Erin Paul Donovan

      Thanks for commenting Ric! I posted your comments below, maybe some will contact you.

      This is from Ric – I was stationed here from Nov 61 untill Sept 63. I was in radar operations and loved this place and was the last person to leave on Sept 20, 1963. I was 17 years old when I arrived there late one night in a snow srorm and I’m 71 years old now…………A lot of years ago.

      Reply
    • Irving Brown

      My husband went to work at the age of 14 for the guy that bought the rights to the base salvaging whatever was left behind.

      Reply
        • Irving Brown

          My husband said that Airforce left everything behind. So imagine what this guy made off this.

          Reply
            • Ric Britton

              They didn't leave much, I was the last man to leave, pulled out on 9-11-63. They left 25 washers and 25 clothes dryers out by the road and they went thru 2 winters out in the weather, typical govt snafu.

              Reply
              • Irving Brown

                My husband said they took out fuel oil, stainless steel, and copper.

                Reply
      • Ric Britton

        I did 22 months in the AF in those mts. And loved every bit of it. A good time in my life. Arrived Nov. '61 and departed Sept ' 63

        Reply
      • Ric Britton

        Hello Howie, it's great to hear from you. Send me a phone number and I'll call you and share some old times 

        Reply

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