Winter Camera Protection, White Mountains

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links, and I will earn a commission if you use that link to make a purchase. This is to help support my blog.

Appalachian Trail - Extreme weather conditions near the summit of Mount Washington during the winter months in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Crawford Path – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Winter Camera Protection, White Mountains – When photographing in adverse winter conditions, one of my concerns is protecting camera gear from the elements. I find using products that are specifically made to protect the camera in harsh conditions to be beneficial. They do take some time to get use to, but are worth the investment.

During harsh weather conditions in the New Hampshire White Mountains, I use Camera Armor*, LensSkins*, and LensCoat*. And for down in the valleys and roadside I like using the Storm Jacket Covers*. These products act as covers for the camera and do a pretty good job at keeping the elements off the camera. The Storm Jacket covers are easy to put on and work well in all seasons. I use mine all the time when it is raining. 

Winter Camera Protection - Appalachian Trail Lakes of the Clouds Hut in extreme weather conditions along Crawford Path in the Presidential Range in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Lakes of the Clouds Hut – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

I keep a Polarizer or UV filter attached to the lens when in poor weather. Bad conditions usually means blowing snow, so I am constantly wiping the lens clean of snow. Doing this in less than ideal conditions can lead to accidentally scratching the glass in the lens. I rather scratch the $50.00 filter than the $2000.00 lens.

Extreme weather conditions along the Appalachian Trail (Crawford Path) in the Presidential Range of the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA during the winter months. Mount Washington is off in the distance.
Mount Washington – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

I do not make lens changes in harsh conditions. And I have tried using lens changing bags, but it is not worth the trouble. Separating the camera from the lens in adverse winter conditions is asking for trouble. So I plan ahead and use one lens the entire time. I find that either my 16-35 lens or 24-70 lens is the best option during poor weather conditions.

Strong winds blow snow across the valley along the Old Bridle Path during the winter months in the White Mountains, New Hampshire USA. Hikers can be seen ascending the trail.
Old Bridle Path – Franconia Ridge, New Hampshire
 

When you invest thousands of dollars into a camera, you want to protect your investment. And the steps you take to protect the camera in poor weather conditions will ensure that it functions properly for many years. And insuring your camera gear is a good security blanket and a must if you run a photography business. However, make sure you understand what the insurance policy does and doesn’t cover.

I know the frustrations involved in finding a good winter set-up, so maybe this blog article will give you some ideas. Just keep in mind what works for me may not work for you. All of the above images can be licensed for publications by clicking on the image you are interested in, and you can see more images of the White Mountains during bad weather conditions here.

Happy image making..


 

* Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links, and I will earn a commission if you use that link to make a purchase. This is to help support my blog.

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Erin Paul is a professional photographer who specializes in environmental conservation and historic preservation photography in the New Hampshire White Mountains. His work is published worldwide, and credits include; Backpacker Magazine, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, the Appalachian Mountain Club, and The Wilderness Society.

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