Scenes of July, White Mountains

Colonel Lewis B. Smith site in Sandwich Notch in Sandwich, New Hampshire.
Abandoned Farmstead – Sandwich, New Hampshire
 

Scenes of July, White Mountains – Boy the month of July has flown by, and I can’t believe we are flipping the calendar to August. The New Hampshire White Mountains has a been a mob scene this month. The great weather has brought many visitors to the White Mountains region looking for relaxation and enjoyment.

Much of my time in July has been spent photographing and scouting in the New Hampshire towns of Campton, Sandwich, and Waterville Valley. I am getting ready to start a new project, and have had to do more scouting than usual for this one. It has been a few years since I last visited Sandwich, and I forgot how beautiful the landscape is. These towns are rich with history, and I recommend visiting them if you have the opportunity.

Beebe River Road in Campton, New Hampshire USA. This area was part of the Beebe River logging Railroad, which operated from 1917-1942.
Beebe River Property (5,435 acres) – Campton, New Hampshire
 

I spent one afternoon this month photographing and exploring land in the Beebe River watershed, along the historic Beebe River Railroad (1917-1942). This land is in the process of being conserved. The Conservation Fund (TCF) purchased a 5,435 acre tract of land in May 2014 from Yankee Forest LLC in the towns of Campton and Sandwich, and they are currently managing the property until it can be permanently protected. It is a great area for fishing, hiking, and mountain biking. To learn more about this tract of land see here.

July 2015 - Scenic view from the summit of Mount Tecumseh in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire. Vandalism (illegal tree cutting) has improved the view from the summit. Forest Service verified the cutting is illegal and unauthorized.
July 2015 – Mt Tecumseh, New Hampshire
 

This July marks my twenty-fourth consecutive month photographing the ongoing vandalism (illegal tree cutting) happening on the summit of Mt Tecumseh. It was a foggy day, and there wasn’t much of a view, but more trees have been cut down. The cutting actually started in 2011, which I reported to Forest Service, and it continues today with no end in sight. If you are trying to make a name for yourself in the White Mountains, this is not the way to go about it. For those following this issue you can see each month’s image here.

Bearcamp River in Sandwich Notch in Sandwich, New Hampshire.
Bearcamp River – Sandwich Notch, New Hampshire
 

When in Sandwich, I ventured up the historic Sandwich Notch Road into Sandwich Notch to photograph a section of the Bearcamp River (above). Bearcamp River is one of the most peaceful rivers I have ever visited in the White Mountains region. And I can’t help but think of a line in John G. Whitter's poem “Among the Hills”.

“To drink the wine of mountain air
 Beside the Bearcamp water”

Front cover of the 2016 White Mountains, New Hampshire wall calendar.
2016 White Mountains, New Hampshire Calendar
 

I want to end this blog article by directing you to my 2016 New Hampshire wall calendars. I have produced two calendars for the 2016 calendar year. One is focused on the state of New Hampshire, and the other is focused on the New Hampshire White Mountains (above). Both calendars look great, and I am excited for you to see them. You can see both calendars here.

All of the above images can be licensed for publications by clicking on the image you are interested in, and you can view more images from the month of July here.

Happy image making..


 

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Erin Paul is a professional photographer who specializes in environmental conservation and historic preservation photography in the New Hampshire White Mountains. His work is published worldwide, and credits include; Backpacker Magazine, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, the Appalachian Mountain Club, and The Wilderness Society.

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