Scenes of February, New Hampshire

Franconia Notch State Park from Artists Bluff in the New Hampshire White Mountains during the winter month of February.
Echo Lake – Franconia Notch, New Hampshire
 

Scenes of February, New Hampshire – Much like last month, the weather here in the New Hampshire White Mountains during the month of February has been a mixed bag. We still have not had any major snow storms, the trails are very icy, and the temperatures have been on the warm side. At the beginning of the month, Echo Lake (above) still had not frozen over yet, and there was not much snow in Franconia Notch.

The lack of snow combined with icy trails has made for slow going, and I have had to rearrange my shooting schedule this month because of the weather. Much of the problem has been just getting around the trail system with all the camera gear I carry. As a working photographer, I have to create marketable imagery in whatever conditions are presented to me on any given day and this month has been a challenge.

Snow making at Cannon Mountain in Franconia Notch State Park of the New Hampshire White Mountains from Eagle Cliff during the winter month of February.
Cannon Mountain – Franconia Notch, New Hampshire
 

Being a resident of the White Mountains, I hate dismal winters like the one we are currently having because it impacts the local economy. Local businesses that rely on the winter season are working harder than ever to make the best of this snowless winter that we are having. Ski mountains, like Cannon Mountain (above), are making snow despite the lack of natural snow, but at this point the snowmobile season maybe a bust.

Marked up trees in a unit of the Pemi Northwest timber harvest project in Benton, New Hampshire. The three orange paint marks usually, not always, mark boundaries of the harvest or other obstacles of concern. The blue paint marks indicate that the tree will be cut. And the black paint marks are covering up old paint markings.
Unit of the Pemi Northwest Project – Benton, New Hampshire
 

I spent one February day searching for another cellar hole of the abandoned 19th century Coventry-Benton hill farm community in Benton. This cellar hole is located in a unit of the Pemi Northwest timber harvest project, and the area (above) is all marked up and appears ready to be cut.

The three orange paint marks usually, not always, mark boundaries of the harvest or obstacles of concern and those trees will not be cut down during the harvest. The blue paint marks indicate that the tree will be cut down, and the black paint marks are covering up old paint markings. Sadly, the orange paint marks are not covered after the harvest is finished and they remain on the trees for many years.

Foot bridge along the Mt Pemigewasset Trail in the White Mountains of New Hampshire during the winter month of February.
Mount Pemigewasset Trail – Lincoln, New Hampshire
 

We also received heavy rains this month, which caused the brooks and rivers in the area to rise. The Mount Pemigewasset Trail in Lincoln crosses a small brook (above) that I usually find unimpressive most days but on the day after the rain storm, it was picture perfect.

Snow-capped Presidential Range just after sunset from along the Presidential Range Rail Trail at Pondicherry Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson, New Hampshire during the winter month of February.
Presidential Range Rail Trail – Pondicherry Wildlife Refuge, New Hampshire
 

I spent one day this month at Pondicherry Wildlife Refuge in Jefferson. This snowless winter has made getting around Pondicherry easy. One of the best views in New Hampshire is from this Refuge along the Presidential Range Rail Trail. And though I prefer this area at sunrise the sunset (above) can be interesting.

All of the above images can be licensed for publications by clicking on the image you are interested in, and you can view more new images from the month of February here.

Happy image making..


 

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Erin Paul is a professional photographer who specializes in environmental conservation and historic preservation photography in the New Hampshire White Mountains. His work is published worldwide, and credits include; Backpacker Magazine, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, the Appalachian Mountain Club, and The Wilderness Society.

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