Standing Up For The White Mountains

Appalachian Trail (Gulfside Trail) - A hiker enjoys the sunset from Mount Clay in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Appalachian Trail – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Standing Up For The White Mountains – Every year, I document a number of environmental issues in the White Mountains. And to start the New Year I am going to publicly share the four issues I will be documenting thus year. The rest of my time will be focused on the scenic White Mountains and New England region. This year I decided to just continue creating imagery for the visual journals that I have worked on for the last few years. Below are links to the journals.

In the internet era, it is important for environmental photographers, like myself, and others who are genuinely concerned about the environment to stand behind our work. People who hide behind IP addresses to promote  misleading information on New Hampshire issues only create credibility issues for themselves. Learn how to identify a credible online resource here.

Abandoned campsite off of Fire Road 511 along the Kancamagus Scenic Byway in the White Mountains, New Hampshire.
Abandoned Campsite – White Mountains, New Hampshire
 

Back-country Camping Impact – The intent of this visual journal is to create awareness for camping impact in the White Mountains. I believe poor leave no trace habits are destroying areas of the White Mountains, and the issue is getting worse. I have been documenting camping impact for many years. For more information and images from this journal see here.

November 2014 - A trail blaze that has been removed by cutting and / or peeling from a yellow birch tree along the Mt Tecumseh Trail in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire.
2 Years +/- After a Trail Blaze Was Removed From Tree – Mt Tecumseh Trail, New Hampshire
 

Trail Blaze Removal – The intent of this visual journal is to record how a yellow birch, along the Tecumseh Trail, responds to having its bark cut away. The bark was cut away in order to remove a painted trail blaze from the tree. I believe positive trail stewardship involves properly removing blazing from trees, and this is not the proper way. I have been documenting this yellow birch tree since 2011. For more information and images from this journal see here.

October 2014 - Scenic view from the summit of Mount Tecumseh in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire USA during autumn months. View shedding (unauthorized cutting) has improved the summit view. Forest Service has verified the cutting is unauthorized.
Unauthorized Cutting – Mt Tecumseh, New Hampshire
 

Photo Monitoring, Mt Tecumseh – The intent of this visual journal is to record the progression of unauthorized cutting (view shedding) taking place on the summit of Mt Tecumseh. What has happened on the summit is an embarrassment to the hiking community, and these glory hound hikers need to be held accountable for their actions. I have been documenting the summit cutting since 2011. For more information and images from this journal see here.

August 2014 - Hillside erosion near stone work along the Mount Tecumseh Trail in Waterville Valley, New Hampshire.
Mt Tecumseh Trail – Waterville Valley, New Hampshire
 

Photo Monitoring, Erosion – The intent of this visual journal is to record the progression of erosion along a section of the Tecumseh Trail. Though the staircase looks beautiful, I believe the environmental impact to the hillside, from the building of the stairs, far outweighs the beauty. I have been documenting this section of trail since 2011. For more information and images from this journal see here.

Every outdoor organization in the White Mountains region is teaching sustainable environmental practices, but yet poor land management is still happening in areas of the White Mountain National Forest. As a conservation minded society we have to be vocal and take a stand to protect New Hampshire’s environment.

Happy image making..


 

Connect with us on Facebook | Subscribe to our blog | See our New Hampshire wall calendars

The following two tabs change content below.
Erin Paul is a professional photographer who specializes in environmental conservation and historic preservation photography in the New Hampshire White Mountains. His work is published worldwide, and credits include; Backpacker Magazine, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, the Appalachian Mountain Club, and The Wilderness Society.

Latest posts by Erin Paul Donovan (see all)

Leave a Reply

  • (will not be published)

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>