Can You Identify These Artifacts

Can you identify these artifacts at Camp 10 along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948) in the Pemigewasset Wilderness of Franconia, New Hampshire.
Unidentified Artifact – East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948)
 

Can You Identify These Artifacts – When documenting historic sites in the New Hampshire White Mountains one of the biggest challenges I face is trying to identify some of the artifacts I photograph. In the big picture of my historical work, identifying what the artifact is and its purpose is important. And because of this, I have to do an extensive amount of research on some artifacts.

So I want to share with you some of the artifacts I have come across that I have yet to identify. I suspect a few of you out there can identify these artifacts. And I would be thrilled if you would share your knowledge with me. I plan on adding a few more artifacts I have yet to identify to this blog article in the future.

Artifacts at Camp 22 which was a logging camp located along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad in the Thoreau Falls Valley of the Pemigewasset Wilderness in Lincoln, New Hampshire. The EB&L was a logging railroad which operated from 1893-1948.
Unidentified Artifact – East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948)
 

The above artifact is in the Thoreau Falls Valley of the Pemigewasset Wilderness in East Branch & Lincoln Railroad territory. I think this artifact is part of the railroad operations or possibly part of something in a rail-side logging camp workshop. Any ideas?

Artifacts at Camp 22 which was a logging camp along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad in the Thoreau Falls Valley of the Pemigewasset Wilderness in Lincoln, New Hampshire. The EB&L was a logging railroad which operated from 1893-1948.
Unidentified Artifact – East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948)
 

The above artifact is also in the Thoreau Falls Valley of the Pemigewasset Wilderness in East Branch & Lincoln Railroad territory. And like the last artifact, I think it may have been part of the railroad operations or possibly part of something in a rail-side logging camp workshop. Any ideas?

Update, this has been identified as being an old blacksmith vise. It functions like a vise.

T Walsh brick along an abandoned spur line of the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad in the Thoreau Falls Valley of the Pemigewasset Wilderness in Lincoln, New Hampshire. The EB&L was a logging railroad which operated from 1893-1948.
T Walsh Brick – East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948)
 

The orange T Walsh brick above is along an old spur line of the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad. This brick is deep in the Pemigewasset Wilderness and is somewhat out of place. I am unsure what type of brick it is. And I am interested to know if anyone can identify the type of brick this is (maybe firebrick or a paving brick)?

Update, it has been verified this is a fire brick. And this may help in identifying a building (blacksmith shop) along the railroad that I have not seen listed on any map or mentioned in any books.

Artifact at Camp 8 along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad in Lincoln, New Hampshire.
Unidentified Artifact – East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948)
 

The above artifact is found closer to civilization along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad. It could be anything, maybe even part of a vehicle. And it might not even be part of the railroad or camp operations. Any ideas?

And here is your friendly reminder about preserving the past. As you explore the abandoned farm communities, logging camps and other historic sites in the New Hampshire White Mountains, please keep in mind that the removal of historical artifacts from federal lands without a permit is a violation of federal law. Take only photos and leave the site as you found it. You can view more historic sites in the White Mountains here.

Happy image making..


 

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Erin Paul is a professional photographer who specializes in the environment and historic preservation of New Hampshire. His work is published worldwide, and credits include; Backpacker Magazine, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, the Appalachian Mountain Club, and The Wilderness Society. His blog articles are intended to create awareness for historic preservation and land conservation.

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