East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Trestle 7

Foot bridge along the Lincoln Woods Trail which crosses Franconia Brook in Lincoln, New Hampshire. Hikers enter into the Pemigewasset Wilderness on the righthand side of this bridge. Old abutments from Trestle 7 of the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893-1948) are used to support this foot bridge.
East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – Trestle 7 (Franconia Brook )
 

East Branch & Lincoln Railroad, Trestle 7 – During the days of the East Branch & Lincoln (EB&L) Railroad, there were two trestles built at this crossing of Franconia Brook (above). And each trestle serviced different areas of today’s Pemigewasset Wilderness. The first trestle built serviced the Franconia Brook and Lincoln Brook Valleys. And the second trestle, built just below the first one, serviced the area surrounding the East and North Fork branches of the Pemigewasset River.

Trestle 7 is different than most trestles along the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad because part of it is still in use today. No log trains pass over it anymore, but hikers use it on a regular basis.

A hiker crosses over Franconia Brook on a foot bridge. At the end of this bridge hikers enter into the Pemigewasset Wilderness. Old abutments from Trestle 7 along the old the East Branch & Lincoln Logging Railroad bed are used to support this foot bridge. Located in Lincoln, New Hampshire USA. The East Branch & Lincoln Railroad operated from 1893-1948.
East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – Trestle 7 (Franconia Brook )
 

The abutments (above) from the second trestle 7 support the footbridge that crosses Franconia Brook. At the far end of this footbridge, hikers leave the popular Lincoln Woods Trail and enter into the backcountry of the Pemigewasset Wilderness. At 45,000 acres, the Pemigewasset Wilderness is the largest designated wilderness area in the White Mountain National Forest.

East Branch & Lincoln Railroad bed near Franconia Brook. This section of railroad crossed the Franconia Brook by means of an wooden trestle and continued into the Franconia Brook Valley of Franconia, New Hampshire USA. This was a logging railroad which operated from 1893 - 1948 .
East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – Site of the First Trestle 7
 

The above image shows the location of where the first trestle 7 crossed Franconia Brook. In the foreground, the trestle rejoined the railroad bed. And from here the railroad continued into the Franconia Brook Valley. This trestle was much longer than what the old pictures of it would lead us to believe. Not much remains of it except abutment holes on the south side of the brook and a few timbers on the north side that were possibly part of the trestle. This is the trestle shown on the cover of Bill Gove’s J.E. Henry's Logging Railroads.

Franconia Brook foot bridge in Lincoln, New Hampshire. Abutments from Trestle 7 of the old the East Branch & Lincoln Railroad (1893 - 1948) are used to support this foot bridge.
East Branch & Lincoln Railroad – Trestle 7 (Franconia Brook )
 

We hear a lot about how negative the logging era was. And there is no denying the destruction from this era. But we take for granted what the railroads left behind. And trestle 7 is a good example of this. Instead of letting the abutments from the second trestle waste away Forest Service has made good use of them. And the ending result is a unique piece of history incorporated into today’s trail system.

All of the above images can be licensed for publications by clicking on the image you are interested in. And you can view more photos of trestle 7 here.

Happy image making..


 

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Erin Paul is a professional photographer who specializes mainly in the environment of New Hampshire. His work is published worldwide, and publication credits include the Appalachian Mountain Club, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, Backpacker Magazine, and The Wilderness Society. His blog articles are intended to create awareness for the environment and to promote his image archive.

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